Ireland’s biological diversity is under pressure like never before. The ongoing programme of conservation assessments conclude that on average 20% of the species that have been assessed are considered to be at risk of extinction in Ireland. Extinction is not a new phenomenon as Ireland has already lost many species. Here is an account of 10 species that are already considered extinct in Ireland.

Solitary bee (Nomada sheppardana)

Solitary bee (Nomada sheppardana)
Nomada sheppardana is a tiny little bee that measures less than half a centimetre long. It is a cuckoo or cleptoparasite which means it parasitises the nests of other bee species in the genus Lasioglossum. Nomada sheppardana is relatively commonly in the far south of England. It was never abundant in Ireland as far as we know. The only Irish record is from Lucan in 1902. We can only assume it was more widespread but that it disappeared without being recorded. Or perhaps it’s still out there waiting to be rediscovered! It is one that is likely to reappear in Ireland as a result of climate change (Photograph: Steven Falk).