Nature responds quickly when land is managed in a way that is more favourable to biodiversity. Everyone who manages land, whether is be a small garden, a large farm or public spaces, can greatly improve the landscape for biodiversity, by making small changes. Here are 10 easy ways that our local environment can be improved to make space for biodiversity

Retain hedgerows and patches of scrub

Retain hedgerows and patches of scrub
Retaining hedgerows provides vital corridors for biodiversity across our countryside, and particularly in farmed landscapes. Hedgerows provide both food and nesting areas for insects, birds and mammals. Flowering hedgerows that contain Willow, Blackthorn and Hawthorn provide vital food for bees in spring and for birds and mammals in the autumn. Hedgerows should only be cut every three years to encourage flowering. The bases of hedgerows should not be sprayed to allow wildflowers to grow and provide areas for insects to nest. Patches of scrub provide similarly important resources for biodiversity within the farmed landscape so these should be retained. (Kilkenny landscape of hedgerows and scrub. Photograph Liam Lysaght)